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Oral Presentations [clear filter]
Monday, May 24
 

9:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 11
Narrative-driven Immersion And Students' Perceptions In An Online Software Programming Course
Mario Madureira Fontes(1), Daniela Pedrosa(2), Tânia Araújo(3), Ceres Morais(4), Aline Costa(5), José Cravino(6), Leonel Morgado(7)
1: Universidade Aberta, Coimbra, Portugal and Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo; 2: Universidade de Aveiro, CIDTFF, UTAD; 3: Universidade de Aveiro; 4: INESC TEC, Porto, Portugal and Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Mossoró, Brasil; 5: Universidade do Porto e INESC-TEC; 6: CIDTFF, Aveiro, Portugal and University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal; 7: INESC TEC, Porto, Portugal and Universidade Aberta, Coimbra, Portugal
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Learning software programming is challenging for software engineering students. In this paper, students' engagement in learning software engineering programming is considered under the SimProgramming approach using the OC2-RD2 narrative technique to create an immersive learning context. The objectives of this paper are twofold: presenting a narrative-driven immersive learning approach to introduce software engineering concepts and coding techniques to online undergraduate students; and analyzing the students' feedback on this approach. Thematic analysis of the metacognitive tasks was performed on the students' fortnightly reflections about their learning progress. Content analysis was based on interest categories, students’ perceptions, metacognitive challenges, narratives, examples and aspects to be kept or to be improved. Data from the content analysis were organized into categories, subcategories, indicators, and recording units and their categorization was peer-reviewed. The narratives were considered by the students as interesting, appealing, akin to professional reality and promoting interaction. Most students thought the approach was helpful for learning software programming.


Monday May 24, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Saturday, June 5
 

8:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 1
Presentations

VERITAS: Mind-mapping in Virtual Reality
Robert Sims, Abhijit Karnik
Lancaster University, United Kingdom
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Inquiry based learning is a modern and innovative learning strategy that aims to stimulate students’ interest in a topic and target Bloom’s higher order cognitive process. Reflective tasks, such as mind mapping, support inquiry-based learning. Virtual Reality (VR) presents novel opportunities to help scaffold reflective tasks in inquiry-based learning by supporting use of the 3D space which is not available via existing 2D mind mapping applications. In this paper we present VERITAS, a VR application for mind-mapping based reflective tasks operating on the low-cost Oculus Go device. We discuss the interaction design for the mind-mapping task and evaluate the system from a usability perspective. Our results show that novice participants are able to learn how to use the interactions quickly and utilize them effectively to build mind-maps in 3D. VERITAS establishes the usability of VR and essential interactions to successfully perform abstract and complex reflective tasks like mind-mapping.


Space, a Central Frontier – The Role of Spatial Abilities When Learning the Structure of 3D AR Objects
Jule Marleen Krüger, Daniel Bodemer
University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany
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Learning about three-dimensional (3D) objects is the focus of many augmented reality (AR) applications. Although this underlines the importance of spatiality in AR experiences, learners’ spatial abilities should be considered in this context. While spatial abilities may compensate for the lack of spatial information in 2D representations (ability-as-compensator hypothesis), they may also be necessary for learning with 3D representations in the first place (ability-as-enhancer hypothesis). In the current study, we examine the role 3D spatial visualization abilities and 2D spatial memory abilities may play when learning with 3D AR objects. Both variables were measured in an exploratory pilot study in which N = 33 participants learned about the spatial structure of the modules of the International Space Station (ISS) with either an AR or a non-AR mobile application. We found that spatial abilities indeed had moderating effects on achievement in the learning task and knowledge test, although the results are inconclusive concerning an ability-as-enhancer or compensator hypothesis. We discuss the results and conclude that it is necessary that researchers take a closer look at the role of learners’ spatial abilities when learning with 3D representations in AR. With additional insights, practitioners can then make informed decisions on using AR applications.


ELLE-ments of Learning: A Framework for Analyzing Multimodal Technical Communication Strategies in an Educational VR Game
Emily Kuzneski Johnson
University of Central Florida, United States of America
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This paper provides a brief overview of technical communication following Peirce’s [2] firstness (aesthetics), secondness (action promotion), and thirdness (explicit explanation), and identifies each of these categories in an educational language learning virtual reality (VR) game created at a university, ELLE-ments of Learning. The framework described here can help game researchers better understand, evaluate, and discuss the ways in which games communicate with players and can also be used by game designers and developers to ensure their games convey important and complicated information to players effectively in each of Peirce’s three categories.

Presenters
RM

Robert Matthew Sims

Lancaster University
avatar for Jule Marleen Krüger

Jule Marleen Krüger

Research Associate & Doctoral Student, University of Duisburg-Essen
I am a 4th year PhD student at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany with a background in Psychology. In my research I examine how AR can effectively and efficiently support learning. In this, I especially focus on three characteristics of AR, which are framed from a human-centered... Read More →
avatar for Emily Kuzneski Johnson

Emily Kuzneski Johnson

Assistant Professor, University of Central Florida
Please see the Zoom link for my video - the transcripts are inaccurate and partially missing in the iLRN YouTube version.https://ucf.zoom.us/rec/share/qID2ItKXv1bdCEc9WyKu8csQWoZSXNafOqB6WUkrKyCjUFyBlwgVvvWv_ABX9WOX.Y_mrxsIAHhRlT1c-


Saturday June 5, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Sunday, June 6
 

7:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 2
Presentations
 
A Taxonomy for Immersive Experience Design
J. J. Ruscella(1), Mohammad F. Obeid(2)
1: AccessVR, Winchester, VA, USA; 2: Division of Applied Technology, Shenandoah University, Winchester, USA, VA
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Immersive technology platforms such as virtual reality (VR) are used by many to create experiences that allow for efficient training, visceral encounters, and faithful reproduction of places and times. This work investigates the various elements that contribute to the design of an effective immersive experience and proposes a taxonomy that establishes levels (ranks) for each of these elements.
 
 
A Longitudinal Study Of Students’ Perceptions Of Immersive Virtual Reality Teaching Interventions
Tanya Hill, Hanneke du Preez
University of Pretoria, South Africa
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A series of virtual reality (VR) sessions was developed to explore students’ perceptions of the use of VR as a teaching intervention during lectures in an undergraduate taxation module. The study was based on the theoretical framework of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and the Educational Framework for immersive Learning (EFiL) and made use of a longitudinal multi-method research design approach. Data was gathered from 566 students over the academic year using three questionnaires which were statistically analyzed. Written reflections were also collected from students and these reflections were thematically analyzed.
The results show that students were positive about participating in a VR teaching intervention before they had been exposed to VR in the classroom and that they remained positive throughout the academic year as the VR interventions were rolled out on three different occasions. Students’ reflections were also overwhelmingly positive, and students believe that VR is an effective and innovative way to enhance learning.
The contribution of this research can be found in its use of a longitudinal study to provide understanding of the perceptions of undergraduate taxation students of the use of VR.
 
 
Integrating a Teaching Concept for the Use of Virtual Reality in University Teaching
Adrian Henrich(1), Tobias Schultze(1), Anette Weisbecker(1), Oliver Riedel(2)
1: IAT University of Stuttgart, Institute of Human Factors and Technology Management, Germany; 2: Fraunhofer IAO, Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering
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As many of the common mistakes made by engineering students are based on weak spatial imagination, the use of virtual reality could help to enhance those skills in undergraduate teaching. As part of a university lecture in product development that covers methods of product development and technical design, the use of virtual reality was integrated into an engineering exercise. Supplementing the usual technical tools like CAD, half of the 14 student groups were allowed to use a dedicated VR-application to review their machine designs in virtual reality. While the objective performance of those groups was not better in comparison to the “non-VR” groups, most of the student groups were able to identify design issues or mistakes through the use of VR, which they couldn’t find using only CAD. According to interviews, 69.7% of the VR-users reported that they were only able to experience and realize “the true spatial dimensions” through the use of VR.

Presenters
TS

Tobias Schultze

IAT University of Stuttgart
MF

Mohammad F. Obeid

Assistant Professor, Shenandoah University
avatar for Hanneke du Preez

Hanneke du Preez

Associate professor, University of Pretoria
I specializes in the fundamental principle of Taxation that includes the principles of equity, fairness, equality, simplicity, etc.  Her research also incorporates the history of Taxation with a focus on the African continent. In education, her interest is on blended learning with... Read More →



Sunday June 6, 2021 7:00am - 8:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela

8:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 3
Presentations

Logibot: Promoting Engagement through Visual Programming in Virtual Reality
Robert Matthew Sims, Nathan Rutherford, Prashanthy Sukumaran, Nikola Yotov, Thomas Smith
Lancaster University, United Kingdom
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In this study we assess the effects of teaching fundamental programming concepts through a virtual reality (VR) visual block-based programming application and its impact on engagement. As a comparison study, participants played an existing desktop-based game (Lightbot) and the developed VR game (Logibot) covering similar gameplay mechanics and block-based programming. Initial results indicate that traditional desktop applications are currently more engaging than VR for teaching programming. We thus identify the need for careful design of interaction methods to support ease of use and reward factors to promote engagement in VR-based learning applications beyond the initial wow-factor.


Influence of HMD Type and Spatial Ability on Experiences and Learning in Place-based Education
Pejman Sajjadi, Jiayan Zhao, Jan Oliver Wallgrun, Peter La Femina, Alexander Klippel
The Pennsylvania State University, United States of America
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With the emergence of different types of Head-Mounted Displays (HMDs), researchers and educators must make informed decisions on what HMDs best support their needs. When performing experiments with relatively large populations, these decisions are largely affected by the sensing-scaling tradeoff between high-end tethered HMDs and lower-end standalone systems. Higher sensing affords a richer experience, but it is also associated with higher costs in terms of the HMD itself and the need for VR-ready computers. These limitations often impede instructors from using high-end HMDs in an efficient way with larger populations. We report on the results of a study in the context of place-based immersive VR (iVR) Geoscience education that compares the experiences and learning of 45 students after going through an immersive virtual field trip, using either a lower-sensing but scalable Oculus Quest or a higher-sensing but tethered HTC Vive Pro. Our results indicate that students who used the Quest reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction but also more simulator sickness (although still a very low number on average) compared to those who used an HTC Vive Pro. Our findings suggest that with content design considerations, standalone HMDs can be a viable replacement for high-end systems in large-scale studies. Furthermore, our results also suggest that in the context of place-based iVR education, the spatial abilities of students (i.e., sense-of-direction) can be a determining factor in their experiences and learning, and therefore an important topic of study for designing effective place-based iVR experiences.



Presenters
RM

Robert Matthew Sims

Lancaster University
avatar for Pejman Sajjadi

Pejman Sajjadi

Postdoctoral Researcher, The Pennsylvania State University


Sunday June 6, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela

9:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 10
Presentations

Talk with the hand: The Language of Gesture in Experiential, Interactive Media
Anna Marie Piersimoni, California State University, Northridge
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Immersive media and its technology are causing major shifts in our self-perception and expression in social relationships, and even, reality itself. This is made manifest through haptic and wearable technology in virtual environments, over distance as well as in a single space, especially that with geo-located interaction. It affects human communication and even language itself, particularly as expressed in gesture, one of the earliest forms of communication. It will include a summary of cultural/linguistic perceptual responses associated to gesture to identify gesture in human communication–as a precursor to language–as seen in primates, infant development, and language acquisition. It will further outline some definitions of gesture and unique properties of haptic technology: elements of touch, gaze, movement, force feedback, physical feedback, telepresence, multitouch, corporeal, gesturo-haptic writing.

Among specific items to explore:
• Identify gestural communication in games and interactive, immersive media
• Human to Machine Haptic Communication
• Human to Human Haptic Communication
• Emojis, Memes, other forms of non-verbal, non-textual communication
• Social Media: Visual modes of expression in groups and collaborative settings
• User Interface and Experience – controllers, head mounted devices, wearables.      

Presenters
avatar for Anna Marie Piersimoni

Anna Marie Piersimoni

Lecturer, California State University, Northridge
Media: Immersive Interactive, EmergingMA, Media Psychology, Fielding Graduate Uinversity. Currently teaching "New Directions in Digital Media at CSUN; Former Director of Digital Content Lab and Internet Publishing at American Film Institute (AFI); former producer/writer for ABC, KCET... Read More →


Sunday June 6, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Monday, June 7
 

7:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 4
Presentations

Failure and Success in Using Mozilla Hubs for Online Teaching in a Movie Production Course
Thommy Eriksson
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
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In the autumn 2020 the course Digital Movie Making was given in a fully online mode, due to the restrictions and lockdowns related to the covid-19 pandemic. With the intention of avoiding Zoom fatigue and provide a more creative and engaging online teaching environment, the social VR platform Mozilla Hubs was chosen for all the lectures, seminars and supervision. The two main reasons for choosing Mozilla Hubs were the openness of the platform, providing wide opportunities for creating and setting up your own virtual space, as well as the option to access the platform via a web browser. However, Mozilla Hubs have a number of usability and technical flaws, making it clumsy to use, and the initial course introduction and guest lecture suffered severe technical issues when all 25 students attended simultaneously. A decision was made to only use Mozilla Hubs for supervision, and this meetings with few students turned out successful. Based on the observations from these learning activities, a number of advantages and disadvantages with VR in general and Mozilla Hubs specifically is presented and discussed.


The Effect of Spatial Design on User Memory Performance Using the Method of Loci in Virtual Reality
Pierre-François Gerard, Frederic Fol Leymarie, William Latham
Goldsmiths, United Kingdom
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Based on the Method of Loci, the following experiment compares the effect of two different virtual environments on participants' memory performance. The primary task consists of remembering a sequence of random playing cards. Each virtual environment is based on a different architectural style with a different layout. One is inspired by a Palladian style architecture, and the other by a Modern curved architecture.


Attention management in a 'Smart' Classroom
Maria Erofeeva, Nils Oliver Klowait
Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, Russian Federation
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Today, technologies like interactive whiteboards, augmented and virtual reality serve as instructional aids to facilitate interactive learning. The aim of this paper is to study how the use of such technologies impacts the dynamics of classroom attention management. Employing a multimodal conversation-analytic framework, we analyze videorecordings of the first encounters with interactive whiteboards, augmented reality and virtual reality across twelve in-person classroom lessons set in four Russian secondary schools. This paper highlights how the teacher, faced with a breakdown of regular channels for managing attention (such as mutually-orientable gaze), uses their voice and body to facilitate the temporal coordination of student contributions, maintain focus on a given classroom activity, and visibly monitor classroom dynamics. The findings suggest means to alleviate tensions between new and old teaching methods, and provide further evidence on the need for a granular vocabulary for the analysis of body-orientation in a classroom context.

Presenters
avatar for Nils Oliver Klowait

Nils Oliver Klowait

Senior Research Fellow, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration
avatar for Pierre-François Gerard

Pierre-François Gerard

Director, Metaxu.studio
My background is in architecture and 3D visualisation. I also completed a PhD in Computing, Goldsmiths, University of London. My architectural approach leads me to explore the effect of spatial design on human experience in immersive virtual environments. I am also looking at the... Read More →
avatar for Thommy Eriksson

Thommy Eriksson

Chalmers University of Technology


Monday June 7, 2021 7:00am - 8:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela

8:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 5
Presentations
 
Implementing Decentralized Virtual Time in P2P Collaborative Learning Environment for Web XR
Nikolai Suslov
Krestianstvo.org, Russian Federation
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Virtual worlds and Web XR technologies offer to both programmers and domain experts nearly unlimited capabilities for creating novel computer-based simulated environments just in a web browser. Virtual time is becoming the new crucial concept of collaborative, immersive virtual learning environments (VLE). This paper explores the Croquet software architecture, which is known for its radical synchronization system with the notion of virtual time. It is ideal for developing collaborative serverless apps, but a tiny stateless server named reflector, on which Croquet heavily relies on still prevents doing that today. This paper presents the research, that transforms reflector into a peer-to-peer application Luminary, by implementing decentralized virtual time. The case study describes the prototype of a collaborative Rubik's Cube simulator, backed by three robots for kids. Finally showing how learners can easily experiment with augmenting physical reality, by creating fully synchronized, collaborative robots, operating in a P2P network.
 
 
METAL: Explorations into sharing 3D Educational content across Augmented Reality Headsets and Light Field Displays
Mengya Zheng, Xingyu Pan, Xuanhui Xu, Abraham Campbell
University College Dublin, Ireland
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Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality become increasingly popular in scientific visualization especially for education where they can support collaborative scientific visualization experiences in the classroom. However, the inherent limitations of head-mounted AR and VR tools are stemming the popularization of these existing content-sharing tools. Instead of sharing 3D educational content between AR/VR headsets, this paper proposes a novel prototype Mixed rEaliTy shAring pLatform (METAL) to allow for 3D educational content to be shared between a Microsoft HoloLens 2 and multiple Looking Glass displays which are a type of Light Field (Multi-view Autostereoscopic) display. This platform allows one teacher to use a HoloLens to manipulate and share different 3D contents with multiple student groups via the network, thus each student group can observe the synchronized 3D educational content with autostereoscopic experiences. Therefore, this proposed prototype enables a low-cost one-to-multiple 3D content sharing experience that allows intuitive 3D model interaction and seamless communication between the students and the teacher.
 
 
Design and Development of AR Applications in Online Higher Education A User-Centred Design Approach
Mitch Peters, Laura Calvet Liñan, Antoni Marín Amatller, Laura Porta Simó, Pierre Bourdin Kreitz
Open University of Catalonia, Spain
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The exploration of augmented reality’s (AR) potential in higher education teaching and learning demonstrates an impressive scope of critical inquiry. Online higher education (OHE) represents a transformation in learning practices and educational paradigms on a global scale, with a significant opportunity for the application of AR through e-learning. The overarching goal of the current study is to understand how the presence of AR applications in an OHE multimedia program impacts student learning. The study aims to design and develop a user-centered, AR prototype application that could be used to enhance student learning in STEM education. Implementing a user-centred approach ensures that learners are taken into account from the beginning of the design process and throughout the iterative design lifecycle. The current paper presents the results from the first phase of a multi-stage research project. First, conceptually designed personas, scenario reviews, and user journey mappings were developed based on identified learner needs and AR system requirements previously identified. The results show the design decisions made while revising AR scenarios from the learner’s perspective and exploring design requirements to ensure the feasibility of the AR application. An implication of our study is to demonstrate the value of a range of evaluation techniques presented here using a user-centred design approach, which can be used to design and develop future AR and Xtended reality technologies in educational scenarios.

Presenters
avatar for Mitchell Joseph Peters

Mitchell Joseph Peters

Fundació per a la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
avatar for Nikolai Suslov

Nikolai Suslov

Software engineer, Krestianstvo.org
Nikolai Suslov is a software engineer and researcher in computer science. His work is focused on virtual worlds software architecture, user-oriented self-exploratory integrated development environments, live coding, human-computer interaction, virtual reality. He is the creator and... Read More →
avatar for Mengya Zheng

Mengya Zheng

Ph.D. Candidate, University College Dublin
I am currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Computer Science Department at University College Dublin. My Ph.D. thesis is using Augmented Reality to visualize current and historical data for Precise Farming decision support explanation.



Monday June 7, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela

9:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 6
Presentations

Measuring and Comparing QoE and Simulator Sickness of Hybrid VR Applications under increased network load
Ioannis Doumanis(1), Daphne Economou(2), Lemonia Argyriou(3)
1: University of Central Lanchashire; 2: University of Westminster; 3: National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos
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The elements of presence and interaction have been connected with high quality learning in online learning environments. This can be achieved by offering learning environments and material that can engage the learner throughout the learning experience, allow them to connect with the content, find relevance, construct meaning and critical thinking. Hybrid VR applications offer great potential in engaging learners in environments that accurately capture the world allowing them to make personal connections and find relevance, which coupled with branching narrative, Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) and interactivity can lead to highly engaging learning experiences. Hybrid VR applications though are bandwidth demanding that can impact the learning experience. This paper presents a study comparing the Quality of Experience (QoE) of a hybrid VR application streamed over the standard internet and POINT network under increased network load. The paper presents the project motivations, it described a pilot study and its output and it closes with conclusions about the effect of the QoE and presence in learning and future directions.



Presenters
avatar for Daphne Economou

Daphne Economou

Senior Lecturer, University of Westminster
I have 20 years’ teaching and research experience in higher education, in the areas of HCI, Mobile UX, Web Design and Development, and in VR. I am particularly interested in the use and the design of VR/AR platforms to engage effectively learners in educational tasks and empowering... Read More →


Monday June 7, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela

10:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 12
Towards an Immersive Learning Knowledge Tree - a Conceptual Framework for Mapping Knowledge and Tools in the Field
Dennis BeckLeonel MorgadoMark J. W. Lee, Christian Gütl, Minjuan Wang, Andreas Dengel, Scott Warren, Jonathan Richter
University of Würzburg, Germany
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The interdisciplinary field of immersive learning research is scattered. Combining efforts for better exploration of this field from the different disciplines requires researchers to communicate and coordinate effectively. We call upon the community of immersive learning researchers for planting the Knowledge Tree of Immersive Learning Research, a proposal for a systematization effort for this field, combining both scholarly and practical knowledge, cultivating a robust and ever-growing knowledge base and methodological toolbox for immersive learning, aimed at promoting evidence-informed practice and guiding future research in the field. This paper contributes with the rationale for three objectives: 1) Developing common scientific terminology amidst the community of researchers; 2) Cultivating a common understanding of methodology, and 3) Advancing common use of theoretical approaches, frameworks, and models.

Presenters
avatar for Dennis Beck

Dennis Beck

Associate Professor, University of Arkansas
Dennis Beck is an Associate Professor of Educational Technology at the University of Arkansas. In his teaching, he enjoys teaching teachers how to use technology in their classrooms. His research focuses on and advocates for digital, educational equity for vulnerable populations... Read More →
avatar for Leonel Morgado

Leonel Morgado

Assistant Professor / Senior Researcher, Universidade Aberta / INESC TEC
Leonel Morgado is Assistant Professor with Habilitation, at the Portuguese Open University, where he lectures on research methods, programming, and the use of virtual worlds. He is also a board member of the international research association, Immersive Learning Research Network... Read More →
avatar for Mark J. W. Lee

Mark J. W. Lee

Executive Vice President & Chief Research Officer, Immersive Learning Research Network
avatar for Christian Guetl

Christian Guetl

Head of CoDiS Lab Graz, Graz University of Technology
Head of CoDiS Lab; background and technical doctorate in computer science; his research interests include information search and retrieval, natural language processing, adaptive media technologies, social media and behavior analytics, e-education and e-assessment, mixed reality and... Read More →
avatar for Andreas Dengel

Andreas Dengel

Research Associate, University of Würzburg
SW

Scott Warren

Professor of Learning Technologies, University of North Texas
avatar for Jonathon Richter

Jonathon Richter

President & Chief Executive Officer, Immersive Learning Research Network


Monday June 7, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Tuesday, June 8
 

7:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 7
Presentations

Getting there? Together. Cultural Framing of Augmented and Virtual Reality for Art Education
Regina Maria Bäck(1), Rainer Wenrich(1), Birgit Dorner(2)
1: Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt; 2: Katholische Stiftungshochschule München
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Informal learning contexts of creating and exploring artefacts through Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) are increasingly common. Nevertheless, insights on art educators` perspectives on potential for conceptualization and classroom implementation are scarce. In this study, both art educators a artists share their perspectives on a variety of AR/VR applications, from creating in multiplayer mode to exploring artefacts and loci in SocialVR.
Overall, twenty art educators were exploring a selection of AR/VR applications. The data was collected during online workshops with art teachers coming from diverse backgrounds (elementary and secondary school, special education). Interviews were conducted with six media artists, including pioneers of AR/VR art. Grounded Theory Methodology, specifically Situational Analysis as well as Visual Grounded Theory Methodology was applied. Results highlight media cultural perspectives in proximity and distance to AR/VR related "worlds", by classifying different journeys from first encounter to conceptualization and implementation.


Mobile Augmented Reality Applications in Teaching: A Proposed Technology Acceptance Model
George Koutromanos(1), Tassos A. Mikropoulos(2)
1: National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece; 2: University of Ioannina, Greece
Watch the presentation video​​​

This study proposed MARAM, a mobile augmented reality acceptance model that determines the factors that affect teachers’ intention to use AR applications in their teaching. MARAM extends TAM by adding the variables of perceived relative advantage, perceived enjoyment, facilitating conditions, and mobile self – efficacy. MARAM was tested in a pilot empirical study with 127 teachers who used educational mobile AR applications and developed their own ones. The results of regression analysis showed that MARAM can predict a satisfactory percentage of the variance in teachers’ intention, attitude, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. Attitude, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions affected intention. Both perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment affected attitude. Furthermore, perceived relative advantage and perceived enjoyment affected perceived usefulness. In addition, mobile self-efficacy and facilitating conditions affected perceived ease of use. However, perceived ease of use did not have any effect on attitude and perceived usefulness. MARAM could serve as the basis for future studies on teachers’ acceptance of mobile AR applications and be expanded through the addition of other variables.

Presenters
avatar for Regina Maria Bäck

Regina Maria Bäck

Ph.D. Candidate, KU / KSH
My research focusses on the potential and media cultural framing of XR in art educational contexts. Looking forward for exchange and inspiration when it comes to quality criteria also thinking of students, from creative potential to data protection.
avatar for George Koutromanos

George Koutromanos

Assistant Professor in ICT in Education, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens



Tuesday June 8, 2021 7:00am - 8:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela

8:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 8
Presentations

Teaching in VR and Cognitive Load: a Teacher’s Perspective
Sarune Savickaite, Elliot Millington
University of Glasgow, United Kingdom, Scotland
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Technology based learning offers a wide range of opportunities in education. However, technological applications pose additional processing demands on the learners’ cognitive resources (Kalyuga & Liu, 2015). High levels of cognitive load in high-tech situations are generally a result of several modes and sources of information being presented simultaneously. Learners are also required to to deal with the uncertainty and non-linear relationships. Instructions, clear procedures and best practise techniques can reduce cognitive load in high-tech environments. Many such environments allow a high degree of learner control, which is beneficial for advanced user, but increases cognitive load for the novice (Kalyuga & Liu, 2015).
Research on cognitive load in VR is dispersed over many specific areas (i.e., navigation, group processes, social interaction, virtual presence and more) and it has been challenging to determine how positive the effects of VR are. Increased CL in VR has been established (Lai & McMahan, 2020; Huang et al., 2020; Schrader and Bastiaens, 2012; Makransky, Terkildsen & Mayer, 2019; van del Land et al., 2013 to name a few), however, there is no consensus on how it can be reduced just yet. Moreover, majority of the literature examines only the learner’s perspective and does not consider the difficulty teacher face learning, adapting and presenting new material in VR. Further, it has been demonstrated that even experienced teachers encounter cognitive difficulties when asked to teach in novel contexts (Kim and Klassen, 2018).

Learning Through Play
Ryan Rosenthal
Rasmussen University, United States of America

This session will explore the parallels of game design and education. We will discuss the similarities in the experiences of students and gamers and how it can impact the classroom. Ideas on how to leverage expectations, advancements and progression will be presented.

Presenters
EM

Elliot Millington

PhD researcher, University of Glasgow
avatar for Sarune Savickaite

Sarune Savickaite

PhD researcher, University of Glasgow
Sarune Savickaite is a PhD candidate at the School of Psychology, University of Glasgow, funded by ESRC/SGSSS. Sarune started her Masters in Research Methods of Psychological Science in September 2018. Sarune previously completed BSc Hons in Psychology at the University of St Andrews.Sarune's... Read More →
RR

Ryan Rosenthal

Rasmussen University


Tuesday June 8, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela

9:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 9
Presentations
 
Exploring Affordances Offered by VR technology in a Language Classroom
Quincy Wang
Simon Fraser University, Canada
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This presentation explores affordances offered by VR technology in the field of language education, and what unique immersive learning experiences that students may have that a traditional classroom lacks. It focuses on embodied language learning, learner agency and immersion as the key added value of VR. The overall goal of this talk is to report how VR technology can make language learning more authentic, engaging, and student-directed. Data from 27 students and one teacher in a grade 7/8 English language learning classroom were collected and analyzed to help understand VR technology’s intervention and pedagogical approaches. Findings demonstrate how VR immersion empowers learning in classrooms and transforms educational experiences, including language fluency, self-confidence, critical thinking, and developing a better understanding of how language works. Importantly, VR is not meant to replace existing teaching methods, materials, and tools; rather, it is intended to be employed to supplement, complement and enhance them.
 
 
How Immersive Virtual Reality Helps Students Retain Information. A Case Study
Lorenzo Santorelli
University of Surrey, United Kingdom
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Immersive Virtual Reality (iVR) is a technology used as innovative pedagogical tool in teaching and learning. However, there is limited evidence evaluating its effectiveness on students’ retention of learning and engagement. I present a four-year study exploring the impact of iVR on learning experience with final-year Biosciences undergraduate students at one UK university. Our findings show that students who experienced iVR sessions retained more information compared to traditional techniques. Students found the VR activity engaging and agreed that it helped to consolidate information. These findings suggest iVR can have a positive impact on student knowledge retention and learning experience.
 
 
Beyond the Horizon: Integrating Immersive Learning Environments in the Everyday Classroom
Andreas Dengel(1), Josef Buchner(2), Miriam Mulders(2), Johanna Pirker(3)
1: University of Würzburg, Germany; 2: University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany; 3: Graz University of Technology
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As Immersive Learning research gains traction, questions arise about how educational Virtual and Augmented Realities can be transferred from laboratory settings and pilot projects into everyday teaching. This paper analyzes existing pedagogical frameworks to identify influencing factors and challenges relevant to teaching and learning with immersive learning environments. We distinguish Immersive Learning as individual learning processes supported by immersive technology and Immersive Teaching as the process of teaching with immersive technology. We subsume learner-specific influences (micro-level), teacher- and classroom-specific influences (meso-level) and institutional and governmental factors (macro-level) for Immersive Teaching and Learning. We conclude that, while investigating isolated variables is important for basic research, efforts integrating Virtual and Augmented Reality in everyday classrooms raise new challenges and questions for future research on the complex relationship between various factors.

Presenters
avatar for Quincy Wang

Quincy Wang

Website Coordinator, Simon Fraser University
Quincy Wang is a Website Developer and Digital Engagement Specialist in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University(SFU). She earned her master’s degree in Educational Technology and Instructional Design from SFU. She is a research collaborator on the Social Sciences and... Read More →
avatar for Lorenzo Santorelli

Lorenzo Santorelli

Teaching Fellow in Zoology, University of Surrey
avatar for Andreas Dengel

Andreas Dengel

Research Associate, University of Würzburg


Tuesday June 8, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
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