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Thursday, May 20
 

7:00am EDT

Medical & Healthcare Education - Oral Presentations 1
Presentations

Virtual Reality Applications For The Treatment Of Anxiety And Psychiatric Disorders
Saeed Safikhani, Johanna Pirker, Selina Wriessnegger
TU Graz, Austria
Watch the presentation video​​​

Virtual Reality (VR) environments are computer-generated mediums that try to provide the user a sense of presence. The use of VR term in science has a long history, but an increasing number of commercial cost-effective VR devices are creating new possibilities and applications for it. Regardless of entertainment, as the most widespread market for VR, the application of VR in medicine is attracting great attention in the scientific field. VR can be used as a tool for public healthcare, as a teaching environment for medical students or to improve the skills of experts, together with a well-accepted method for physical rehabilitation and mental therapies. The focus of this review paper is on the use of VR for psychiatric and anxiety disorders. Several empirical studies show the effectiveness of VR in improving the conditions of patients in a manner comparable to traditional methods and with long-lasting effects in their daily lives. However, a small number of case studies or the lack of a detailed comparison between VR and conventional methods is the shortcoming of current studies. In this paper, we review different VR applications focusing on the identification of the technologies used, the evaluation methods applied, and the results of the studies.

Presenters
avatar for Saeed Safikhani

Saeed Safikhani

University Project Assistant, Graz University of Technology


Thursday May 20, 2021 7:00am - 8:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Saturday, May 22
 

9:00am EDT

Nature & Environmental Sciences - Oral Presentations 1
Presentations
 
Place-Based Learning through a Proxy – Variations in the Perceived Benefits of a Virtual Tour
Jan Oliver Wallgrün(1), Eric Knapp(2), Alan Taylor(3), Alexander Klippel(3), Jiayan Zhao(3), Pejman Sajjadi(3)
1: Independent Researcher; 2: US Forest Service; 3: Penn State University
Watch the presentation video​​​

Place-based and fieldwork learning play a key role in higher education in environmental sciences and other geo-spatial disciplines. We report on a study in which we evaluated a web-based virtual tour application for teaching natural resource management in fire-prone western forests in two undergraduate classes. The virtual tour uses 360°-image-based virtual scenes and pre-recorded audio commentary by a domain expert to lead participants through the Stanislaus-Tuolumne Experimental Forest where forest treatments were implemented to reduce fire hazard. We present results from assessing students’ overall perception of the virtual tour, their views towards its application in undergraduate education, and their feedback for improving the design of future virtual tours. Furthermore, we discuss the collected data from the perspective of gender differences and differences in familiarity with the topic of the tour.
 
 
Spatial Learning with Extended Reality - A Review of User Studies
Bing Liu(1), Linfang Ding(2), Liqiu Meng(1)
1: Chair of Cartography, Technical University of Munich, Germany; 2: KRDB Research Centre, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy
Watch the presentation video​​​

Spatial learning is a process of acquiring spatial knowledge and the foundation of our daily interactions with the living environment. Extended reality (XR) has been widely used in spatial learning research for decades with two representative types - Virtual reality (VR) and Augmented reality (AR). VR is often used to understand spatial learning behavior and spatial cognition process, and AR has great potential to assist spatial learning in real world. This short paper reviews the studies on the deployment of VR and AR to evaluate or assist spatial learning. We summarize the devices, technologies and analysis methods used, and identify factors that need to be considered in experimental design. Our work serves as a reference for new researchers who intend to design further user studies on spatial learning with VR and AR technologies.

Presenters
JZ

Jiayan Zhao

Postdoctoral Researcher, The Pennsylvania State University
avatar for Bing Liu

Bing Liu

Ph.D. Candidate, Technical University of Munich
In her Ph.D. study, Bing focuses on spatial learning during MR-based navigation. She is also experienced in using eye-tracking and fMRI in spatial ability and cognition research.


Saturday May 22, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Thursday, May 27
 

7:00am EDT

Language, Culture, & Heritage - Panel Session 2: Pluriversal Design Transitions for Higher Education Motivated by COVID-19
Pluriversal Design Transitions for Higher Education Motivated by COVID-19
Lupita Guillen Mandujano(1), Erdas Kuruc(2), Jun-Li Lu(3), Paola Sanoni(4), Xanat Vargas Meza(3)
1: Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Campus Xochimilco, Mexico; 2: Eastern Mediterranean University, Cyprus; 3: University of Tsukuba, Japan; 4: Kyoto University, Japan
 
This panel seeks to overview how immersive learning technologies can be used for Higher Education (HE) in several non-westernized contexts amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Through the outline of pluriversal design combined with design transitions, we aim to explore how a world containing many coexisting worlds can resurge from the present educational challenges and become a fairer, sustainable place for everyone.

Presenters
LG

Lupita Guillen Mandujano

Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Campus Xochimilco
avatar for Xanat Vargas Meza

Xanat Vargas Meza

Assistant Professor, University of Tsukuba
avatar for Erdas Kuruc

Erdas Kuruc

Senior Instructor/ Faculty member, Eastern Mediterranean University
PS

Paola Sanoni

Senior Lecturer, Kyoto University
JL

Jun-Li Lu

University of Tsukuba



Thursday May 27, 2021 7:00am - 8:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Tuesday, June 1
 

9:00am EDT

Doctoral Colloquium 1
Presentations

Pandemic pirouettes: AR Ballet Exploring Data Ethics for the Computing Classroom
Genevieve Smith-Nunes(1), Alex Shaw(2)
1: University of Cambridge, United Kingdom; 2: Glaston Bridge Software
Watch the presentation video

This Doctoral Colloquium paper explores the pivot from in-person to virtual and digital means in developing an Augment Reality (AR) classical ballet experience due to Covid-19. This work-in-progress explores novel teaching and learning approaches to the computing concepts of data transmission, signal processing, and therefore necessarily data ethics through classical ballet and bio-metric data the body and brain waves as data artefacts, the data ethics implications of bio-metrics. Innovative approaches to subject knowledge, programming competency, and probing engender thinking of the field of computing if any. This study uses the emergent methodology of AgileDBR, a hybrid of design-based research (DBR) and Agile developed as part of author one's Ph.D.

Designing VR Environments For Distance Learning
Richard Ngu Leubou(1,2), Benoit Crespin(1), Marc Trestini(2)
1: XLIM UMR CNRS 7252, University of Limoges, France; 2: LISEC UR 2310, University of Strasbourg, France
Watch the presentation video

Virtual reality takes learner participation to a higher level of interaction, offering a real experience and a new way to acquire real-world in a distance learning device. Designing VR environments for distance learning leads to an examination of the technical and methodological choices to ensure a useful, usable and efficient tool. Our work is based on the design approaches and recommendations from existing works related to VR and/or distance learning, in order to formalize the design of collaborative VR environments specifically dedicated to distance learning.

A Qualitative Study to Explore the Use of Augmented Reality as Performance Support in Industries
Yao Huang
Florida State University, United States of America
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When augmented reality (AR) technology is used in the learning and development field, it is often viewed from a training perspective. Human Performance Technology (HPT) professionals start to explore the potential of adopting AR on mobile devices as a performance support tool to help field workers across industries. This paper captures the adoption of how mobile AR is used in organizations to address performance issues. The study will use the Critical Incident Technique (CIT) to interview ten organizations. The purpose is to uncover the critical events on why mobile AR is considered an appropriate intervention, what benefits and challenges the organizations encounter, what processes are followed when designing and implementing mobile AR, and what types and functions of mobile AR are used to assist job performance.

Immersive Media in Remote Schooling: “I was surprised at how engaged I was”
Eileen McGivney
Harvard University, United States of America
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With protracted school closures forcing young people to learn remotely, schools are in urgent need of innovative approaches that can keep students engaged in their education and support their learning. Immersive technologies like virtual reality (VR) and 360-degree videos have been shown to increase motivation to learn and student focus, but little is known about their effectiveness in a remote schooling model. This paper reports preliminary results of a mixed methods case study using 360-videos and Google Cardboard viewers in remote high school engineering classes. The students’ surveys and interviews indicate they find online learning difficult, but that 360-videos are more engaging than other instructional media and may be particularly useful for facilitating observational learning.

VeRdict: Imbuing VR Language Learning Applications with Dictionary Functionality
Louis Lecailliez, Noel H. Vincent
Kyoto University, Japan
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As VR hardware becomes increasingly performant and accessible, interest has grown among researchers regarding how to leverage its immersive qualities in an educational context. Immersion, however, often comes at the expense of multitasking functionality and use of supplementary learning resources. This presents an issue for language learners, who upon encountering an unfamiliar word in VR, may have to remove their goggles or switch applications to consult a dictionary. Thus, in order to make dictionary use more immersive and convenient for learners, we present VeRdict, a dictionary extension for VR learning applications that enables dictionary searches from directly within an application using motion controls. Its client-server architecture allows for the delivery of lexicographic content augmented with optional 3D object data, which can be used to display dictionary entries and accompanying 3D visuals. The dictionary can be used to perform manual vocabulary searches using a virtual keyboard, or be used through labels applied to elements within the virtual scene. Additionally, 3D objects loaded from the dictionary server can be used as virtual `props'—unlocking new gesture-based communicative possibilities.

Presenters
NH

Noel H. Vincent

PhD Student, Kyoto University
avatar for Genevieve Smith-Nunes

Genevieve Smith-Nunes

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Cambridge
Reimagining computing science education and data ethics through biometric data and classical ballet.
avatar for Benoit Crespin

Benoit Crespin

University of Limoges
Benoit Crespin is an assistant professor in Computer Science at the University of Limoges. His research interests include computer graphics, VR environments, GPU computing and computational fluid dynamics.
avatar for Richard Ngu Leubou

Richard Ngu Leubou

PhD Student, University of Limoges
avatar for Yao Huang

Yao Huang

Doctoral Candidate, Florida State University
Yao Huang is currently a doctoral candidate in the Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies program at Florida State University. Yao’s research focuses on Human Performance Improvement, especially how mobile and augmented reality technologies enhance performance support in... Read More →
avatar for Eileen McGivney

Eileen McGivney

Ph.D. Student, Harvard University


Tuesday June 1, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am EDT
Graduate Student Lounge & Meeting Room iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Thursday, June 3
 

7:00am EDT

Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, Access, & Social Justice - Oral Presentations 1
​​​​Presentations

Comparison of Direct and Vicarious VR Learning Experience: A Perspective from Accessibility and Equity
Gege Li, Heng Luo, Shaopeng Hou, Min Zhu
Central China Normal University, China, People's Republic of
Watch the presentation video​​​

A common challenge for adopting virtual reality (VR) in education is that limited VR devices are often shared among a large group of students. Consequently, there are two types of VR learners: Performers who acquire virtual learning experience through direct engagement in VR and observers who acquire such experience vicariously through observation. To explore the influence of learner type on VR learning, this study conducted a quasi-experiment with 53 elementary school students to examine the difference in VR learning experiences between the performers and the observers. The study results supported the observed VR learning experience as an adequate alternative to direct VR engagement as the observers demonstrated overall comparable learning patterns in reflection, emotion, engagement, and social interaction during the post-VR debriefing, except for the behaviors of recall and interpretation. The research findings can shed light on the issues of accessibility and equity in VR-based instruction and inform the design and implementation of large-scale VR educational programs.

Student Engagement with Reduced Bias in a Virtual Classroom Environment
Ray Freiwirth1, Esther Brandon
1; The Commons XR, United States of America; 2: Brandeis University, United States of America
Watch the presentation video

To Transcend is critical, but the path must contain a mechanism to both combat dis-engagement and bias in a classroom environment. Why bias and engagement issues as one; because one can create an issue with the other. Not all engagement issues are bias related, but many are. And not all bias issues may create dis-engagement, but certainly there are many studies that seem to point that it can. Why not use tools in the classroom that can improve engagement and reduce both explicit and implicit bias? Virtual reality is one such tool if used correctly. Join us to explore the possibilities of a classroom environment that might help out the next generation of students to transcend the norms of today!

Presenters
RF

Ray Freiwirth

Student / Startup Founder, The Commons XR
avatar for Esther Brandon

Esther Brandon

Digital Literacy Specialist, Brandeis University
Esther Brandon is the Digital Literacy Specialist for undergraduate and graduate programs at Brandeis University. She is an enthusiastic seeker of new instructional technologies, focused on best teaching practices. Esther holds a Masters of Arts in Teaching in Secondary Education... Read More →
avatar for Gege Li

Gege Li

Research Assistant, Central China Normal University
Gege Li is a postgraduate student in Faculty of Artificial Intelligence in Central China Normal University. She is interested in online learning and VR in education.


Thursday June 3, 2021 7:00am - 8:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela
 
Tuesday, June 8
 

7:00am EDT

Basic Research & Theory - Oral Presentations 7
Presentations

Getting there? Together. Cultural Framing of Augmented and Virtual Reality for Art Education
Regina Maria Bäck(1), Rainer Wenrich(1), Birgit Dorner(2)
1: Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt; 2: Katholische Stiftungshochschule München
Watch the presentation video

Informal learning contexts of creating and exploring artefacts through Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) are increasingly common. Nevertheless, insights on art educators` perspectives on potential for conceptualization and classroom implementation are scarce. In this study, both art educators a artists share their perspectives on a variety of AR/VR applications, from creating in multiplayer mode to exploring artefacts and loci in SocialVR.
Overall, twenty art educators were exploring a selection of AR/VR applications. The data was collected during online workshops with art teachers coming from diverse backgrounds (elementary and secondary school, special education). Interviews were conducted with six media artists, including pioneers of AR/VR art. Grounded Theory Methodology, specifically Situational Analysis as well as Visual Grounded Theory Methodology was applied. Results highlight media cultural perspectives in proximity and distance to AR/VR related "worlds", by classifying different journeys from first encounter to conceptualization and implementation.


Mobile Augmented Reality Applications in Teaching: A Proposed Technology Acceptance Model
George Koutromanos(1), Tassos A. Mikropoulos(2)
1: National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece; 2: University of Ioannina, Greece
Watch the presentation video​​​

This study proposed MARAM, a mobile augmented reality acceptance model that determines the factors that affect teachers’ intention to use AR applications in their teaching. MARAM extends TAM by adding the variables of perceived relative advantage, perceived enjoyment, facilitating conditions, and mobile self – efficacy. MARAM was tested in a pilot empirical study with 127 teachers who used educational mobile AR applications and developed their own ones. The results of regression analysis showed that MARAM can predict a satisfactory percentage of the variance in teachers’ intention, attitude, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. Attitude, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions affected intention. Both perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment affected attitude. Furthermore, perceived relative advantage and perceived enjoyment affected perceived usefulness. In addition, mobile self-efficacy and facilitating conditions affected perceived ease of use. However, perceived ease of use did not have any effect on attitude and perceived usefulness. MARAM could serve as the basis for future studies on teachers’ acceptance of mobile AR applications and be expanded through the addition of other variables.

Presenters
avatar for Regina Maria Bäck

Regina Maria Bäck

Ph.D. Candidate, KU / KSH
My research focusses on the potential and media cultural framing of XR in art educational contexts. Looking forward for exchange and inspiration when it comes to quality criteria also thinking of students, from creative potential to data protection.
avatar for George Koutromanos

George Koutromanos

Assistant Professor in ICT in Education, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens



Tuesday June 8, 2021 7:00am - 8:00am EDT
Circle of Scholars Assembly Hall iLRN Virtual Campus, powered by Virbela